This IKEA VITTSJÖ unit is now a rattan home bar with a retro aesthetic

What happens when the Swedish label meets 1970's design trends? You get this ageless statement piece

IKEA VITTSJÖ hack
(Image credit: Carolin Walkhoff / @cywalk)

Interior experts have shared their trend predictions for 2022 – and rattan is going nowhere. This cane-look has endured since the 70s, but this modern Scandi twist brings it firmly into the new year. 

This IKEA hack comes courtesy of Carolin Walkhoff (@cywalk (opens in new tab)), a Germany-based designer who transformed her VITTSJÖ (opens in new tab) unit into a rattan home bar that is sure to start conversations at any house party. But how did the IKEA staple transform into the bespoke piece in question? Here, Carolin walks you through the design process. 

IKEA VITTSJÖ hack

(Image credit: Carolin Walkhoff / @cywalk)

IKEA VITTSJÖ hack

IKEA is known for its minimalist design; however, Carolin shared that she wanted something that looked bespoke in her home. The secret? Create drawers that will elevate the unit – and make it feel wholly individual. Carolin shares that she formed her modern decorating idea (opens in new tab) alongside a friend who owns a VITTSJÖ unit. 

‘Firstly, I measured the shelf to find the correct size before drawing the design,’ Carolin says. She then picked up some glued wood, and we ordered Viennese mesh online. ‘I also needed black paint, sandpaper, wood glue, bolts, staple needles, and felt pads,’ the designer adds. 

IKEA VITTSJÖ hack

(Image credit: Carolin Walkhoff / @cywalk)

With the preparation complete, Carolin cut the wood for the bottom, the backside, and both sidewalls with a table circular saw. She then created strips of wood for the frame out of the glued wood before sanding everything to ensure a smooth finish. 

Using a chop saw, Carolin then cut the frame elements. ‘With the help screw clamps and wood glue, it was possible to build the frames,’ she explains. ‘We also built an inside frame to make [the process] easier.’

IKEA VITTSJÖ hack

(Image credit: Carolin Walkhoff / @cywalk)

After finishing the frame, the designer started work on the ‘corpus’ drawers without the frame – using bolts and wood glue. ‘Afterwards, we fixed the frames with wood glue and screw clamps,’ she says. 

Once the structure was in place, Carolin painted it with a paint roller and brushes. After drying, she drying we sized the back of the frame to cut the Viennese mesh. Then, using a staple gun and needles, she clamped the mesh to complete the project. 

IKEA VITTSJÖ hack

(Image credit: Carolin Walkhoff / @cywalk)

This is the home bar idea every VITTSJÖ deserves. Happy hacking, one and all. 

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc’s homes titles, including Livingetc and Homes & Gardens. As a News Writer, she often focuses on micro-trends, wellbeing, celebrity-focused pieces, and everything IKEA. 


Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and expansive collection of houseplants.