Lavender has had a modern makeover – and forecasters predict it will be the Color of the Year for 2023

A pretty Provençal palette is set to take over our interiors, but it's not the purple you may already know

Jonathan Adler designed lavender room with gray sofa and artwork
(Image credit: Jonathan Adler)

Lavender is expected to be the Color of the Year for 2023, according to trend forecasters WGSN. However, it's not quite the lavender you may expect.

While references to lavender may fill your head with visions of beautifully dusty hues and Southern French allure, WGSN has announced a contemporary shade that is set to make waves in the interiors world. 

Yes, Coloro + WGSN has crowned Digital Lavender as the shade of 2023 – and figures across the industries are expected to embrace this hue in all its futuristic glory. However, what makes Digital Lavender so attractive? And how can we inject its tones into our scheme? 

Here, designers react to the color and share their painted wall ideas – so you can prepare your home for the inevitable craze. 

Lavender painted hallway with home decor accessories

(Image credit: Crown)

Perhaps most notably, in their discussion of the color trend, experts celebrate Digital Lavender for its calming qualities that promote balance, stability, and serenity. 

The hue provokes consumers to maintain 'recuperative rituals' that bring elements of tranquility to their ordinary daily routine. It is this therapeutic nature that makes it so sought-after amongst designers and consumers alike. 

'Working with tones that are reminiscent of nature can help to create a welcoming and nourishing energy,' explains UK Marketing Director of Benjamin Moore (opens in new tab), Helen Shaw. 

Lavender paint with purple chair and white lampshade

(Image credit: DULUX)

'If you're looking to add a splash of color, soft pastel hues such as pale blues, sage greens, and lavenders will create a relaxing, sanctuary feel to the room and evoke a healing energy,' she adds.

Similarly, Crown's (opens in new tab) Colour Consultant, Kathryn Lloyd, reinforces its' soothing and refreshing' ambiance, suggesting that it is already one of the 'latest color trends we're seeing in our homes.'

'Lavender works well in virtually any room, but I particularly like using it to create a restful bedroom scheme or a more colorful hallway,' she adds in the discussion of her expert hallway ideas

Lavender paint in a kitchen

(Image credit: Annie Sloan)

Alongside its calming assets, the color also stems from the digital industry as WGSN expects the tone will 'converge across the virtual and physical worlds. 

Plus, forecasters are additionally praising the color for its gender-inclusivity, which is anticipated to extend across all design industries by 2023. 

However, you don't need to take our word for it. Instead, our recent guest editor, Jonathan Adler (opens in new tab), also admires the shade's depth, explaining that 'lavender is the pastel du jour' and he is 'obsessed' with the shade.' 

'I've always been lavender skeptical, perhaps because I'm insecure in my own masculinity?  Well, I'm insecure no more,' he adds. 'Lavender feels dreamy and floaty and surreal. And lavender plays well with others – navy, chocolate brown, taupe, and white'. 

Jonathan Adler decorated room with lavender chair

(Image credit: Jonathan Adler)

With its therapeutic, versatile, and inclusive assets, we expect lavender's contemporary sister will bless our walls in 2023 and beyond. You heard it here first. 

More information about Coloro + WGSN's Color of the Year is available here (opens in new tab)

Megan Slack
News Writer

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc’s homes titles, including Livingetc and Homes & Gardens. As a News Writer, she often focuses on micro-trends, wellbeing, celebrity-focused pieces, and everything IKEA. 


Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and expansive collection of houseplants.