This IKEA hack has turned a chest of drawers into a designer-inspired cabinet

The Scandi unit is now a curved cabinet with fluted details and a bespoke marble aesthetic

IKEA Bjorkoviken hack
(Image credit: Annie Williams / @champagne.chaos)

How did an IKEA unit become a designer-inpsired statement piece? With wood glue, a few nails, and a whole lot of inspiration. 

Enter our new favorite BJÖRKÖVIKEN door makeover – a Scandinavian staple that makes a designer fluted console accessible to all. This (almost identical) replica will demand attention in your living room, entryway, or landing (as seen here), and it will struggle to fall out of style – so this IKEA hack is worth the investment.

The transformation comes from Annie Williams (@champagne.chaos (opens in new tab)), an Ohio-based designer who is currently renovating her home in the state capital, Columbus. Annie was inspired by Arhaus’s $3,000 Finnley Media Cabinet (opens in new tab) – a mixed-material focal point complemented by luxe white marble.  

IKEA Bjorkoviken hack

(Image credit: Annie Williams / @champagne.chaos)

‘I immediately was drawn to the IKEA BJÖRKÖVIKEN (opens in new tab) cabinet doors because they looked so similar to the $3,000 fluted Arhaus media console that I love so much,’ Annie says. Sharing her modern decorating ideas with Livingetc, the designer revealed an insight into the hack of the moment. 

IKEA BJÖRKÖVIKEN hack – before 

IKEA Bjorkoviken hack

Styled by IKEA

(Image credit: IKEA)

Annie originally hoped to use IKEA cabinet bases alongside her BJÖRKÖVIKEN doors (such as the BJÖRKÖVIKEN on the BESTÅ unit, as seen above). However, her cabinet bases were sold out at the time of her renovation, so she opted for four small stock cabinets from Home Depot for the base.

‘Four IKEA BJÖRKÖVIKEN cabinet doors made up the shell,’ Annie says. ‘The most difficult part was getting the MDF cabinet doors to curve on the sides, using kerf cuts.’ According to the designer, the Kerf cuts were a series of close-together cuts that she made down the back of the wood – almost but not all the way through.

‘I used a circular saw for these cuts, along with a lot of trial and error,’ Annie adds. She attached the sides with a lot of wood glue and a few nails. The designer then attached the two center cabinet doors to the hinges, which created access to the inside storage. 

IKEA BJÖRKÖVIKEN hack – after

IKEA Bjorkoviken hack

(Image credit: Annie Williams / @champagne.chaos)

After completing the fluted doors, Annie cut a curved top from the plywood for the top of the unit. She then built platform legs for the bottom and painted both. ‘I also attached to studs for added support since the piece is heavy,’ Annie adds. 

IKEA Bjorkoviken hack

(Image credit: Annie Williams / @champagne.chaos)

While the piece is able to stand as a dramatic furnishing without any additional accessories, Annie elevated her designer IKEA hack by introducing a large rustic vase and gold photo frame (to complement the gold handles). This is the transformation every BJÖRKÖVIKEN deserves.  

Megan Slack
News Writer

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc’s homes titles, including Livingetc and Homes & Gardens. As a News Writer, she often focuses on micro-trends, wellbeing, celebrity-focused pieces, and everything IKEA. 


Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and expansive collection of houseplants.