5 ways to bring the beauty of The Maine restaurant into your home

Old-world British elegance marries New England glamour at The Maine – its designer reveals the secrets to its style

The Maine
(Image credit: The Maine)

If you don't already know about Maine, you will do soon. Located in a historic Grade II listed townhouse on the fringe of London’s Mayfair, the space balances urban glamor with ageless elegance, and it's set to become your new favorite hangout. 

In an interview with Livingetc, Canadian restaurateur Joey Ghazal and designer Shayne Brady share how to mirror its modern decorating ideas in your home. 

1. Give your chandeliers a modernized twist  

The Maine

(Image credit: The Maine)

Our Capiz chandeliers were custom-made to fit the intricate floral rosettes in the Drawing Room ceiling. They are made from thousands of lightweight windowpane oyster shells, which emanate a beautiful amber glow in the room and are a nautical nod to New England. 

They are timeless statement pieces that can hang on the ceiling or the corner of the room. In your home, choose something that is thought-provoking. When it comes to lighting ideas, overscale, be dramatic, be confident, and have a point of view. Don’t shy away from your personality.

2. Experiment with retro cane chairs 

The Maine

(Image credit: The Maine)

We chose the cane chairs to bring the outdoor inside. They pay homage to the Shaker style of 19th century New England which favored natural materials. We wanted brutal black accents within the space as a contrast to the neutral hues of the travertine and the autumnal colors of the sofas. 

I suggest having a few black accent pieces in any room or against a white wall. To create something similar, textured cushions add a layer to any space; these chairs provide the perfect backdrop to add woven linen or modern striped fabrics to curate a point of view. 

3. Make a statement with your house plants  

We wanted plants that would frame the bijoux martini bar. Veitchia palms were perfect because they draw your eye to the intricate ceiling. I love how tropical they feel and the shadow they cast on the roof with the help of the canister lights from underneath. It is also inspired by colonial Planting and New England Gardens. 

Why go small? Always play with scale and go big. The Palm provides the perfect backdrop to contrast with the elegant mouldings and cornice work of the ground floor drawing room heritage detail.  

4. Celebrate ornate embroidery 

The Maine

(Image credit: The Maine)

The embroidery is an embodiment of the sense of craft throughout the house. Birds and foliage is a key theme running through the space. The embroidery is a beautiful design by Watts of Westminster, which we reinterpreted in custom colors bespoke for the house. 

Always respect whatever architecture from whatever period you have and work with it as opposed to against it. If you are always respectful of the bones of a building, the furnishings can be layered to create a timeless space. Don’t follow trends, but design to your own taste while remaining mindful of the space. 

5. Invest in rustic accessories  

The Maine

(Image credit: The Maine)

We sourced our accent pieces at various antique shops on Church street and Portobello road. We wanted to fill the space with curiosities and storied objects that felt like they had collected over centuries of expeditions in Africa and the Americas. 

The most important thing when combining ceramic pots, masks, stone objects, and wood objects is handcrafted and artisanal. Always buy pieces that you relate to or give you an emotional connection. Choose items that you love that will elevate your space. 

You can find The Maine (opens in new tab) at Unit 6, Medici Courtyard, 20 Hanover Square, London W1S 1JY. In the meantime, we're bringing its decadence into our dining room ideas pronto. 

Megan Slack
News Writer

Megan is a News Writer across Future Plc’s homes titles, including Livingetc and Homes & Gardens. As a News Writer, she often focuses on micro-trends, wellbeing, celebrity-focused pieces, and everything IKEA. 


Before joining Future, Megan worked as a News Explainer at The Telegraph, following her MA in International Journalism at the University of Leeds. During her BA in English Literature and Creative Writing, she gained writing experience in the US while studying in New York. Megan also focused on travel writing during her time living in Paris, where she produced content for a French travel site. She currently lives in London with her antique typewriter and expansive collection of houseplants.