Ring is launching a security camera drone that 'patrols' your home – here's what we know so far

Would you introduce a drone into your home to act as a digital security guard? Well Ring's latest device does just that

A ring video drone in a living rooom
(Image credit: Ring)

You've heard of video doorbells, but what about video drones that patrol your home? It might sound like something from the future, but that's exactly what's on offer from Ring's latest security system that has been recently previewed at a consumer tech show. The 'Always Home Cam' offers surveillance of every angle of your home with a flying camera, and we think it's pretty cool. 

If your mind is conjuring the sort of futuristic technology from a Sci-Fi movie, you wouldn't be far off. And yet, a long way from creepy or threatening, this security camera is designed to keep your home and its contents safe. From robot vacuums to voice-controlled smart speakers, we're all embracing more technology in our so-called smart homes, but this latest piece of kit takes things to a whole new level. Could it be the best home security system yet? 

Naturally, we wanted to know more. From the best features of this new home security system to the expected price and release date, here's everything we know so far about Ring's Always Home Cam. 

Lilith headshot for bio
Lilith Hudson

Lilith is an expert at following news and trends across the world of interior design. She's committed to helping readers make the best choices in their homes through sharing practical tips and guides, and answering all their tech related questions. In this article, she investigates Ring's new home security system, which comes in the form of a drone.

How does the Ring Always Home Cam work? 

A ring drone charging base on a wooden table

(Image credit: Ring)

Ring's Always home Cam works like any other drone, except it flies autonomously rather than remotely by following preset flight paths. The drone uses a quadcopter design with a 1440x1440 HD camera which has a 120-degree field of view, both up and down, as well as a built-in LED to help illuminate in low light. 

Unlike indoor security cameras that just monitor a single room, the idea is that this drone camera moves around your whole home when you’re away - be it on a vacation or just a trip to the store. Even if you're just worried you've left a window open or the stove on, you can simply tap into your real-time video from the Ring app and check. It follows a set path using navigation sensors and can be mapped to up to 50 different routes, and will also trigger a notification on your app if it notices any suspicious activity. At first glance, it sounds like an anxiety-sufferers dream come true. 

Drone enthusiasts might be sold, but it's worth pointing out that unlike a traditional drone the Always Home Cam doesn't allow users to manually intervene during flight. That said, during its flight you can use the Ring app to command the camera to pause, resume, rotate, end the flight or return to the charging dock. 

Does the Always Home Cam work with other Ring devices?

A person viewing a live feed of their home on their phone

(Image credit: Ring)

If you're a fan of the Ring doorbell or alarm system, you might be wondering if your devices can be paired. While it can't be used with your video doorbell, the Always Home Cam is compatible with Ring Alarm Security System and Ring Alarm Pro Security System. 

You can train the Always Home Cam to fly along specific flight paths whenever your Alarm is set off while in Away Mode. So, if your Ring Alarm contact sensors or motion detectors are triggered, Always Home Cam can automatically fly to it to see what’s happening.

Are there any negatives?

It's certainly an exciting innovation and the first smart home device of its kind, but there are a few drawbacks to the Always Home Cam worth mentioning. While it easily navigates its way back to the docking station when it needs to charge, it only has a fly time of up to five minutes, suggesting the battery could do with some work. 

On the Amazon page (opens in new tab), it also states that you'll need two Always Home Cams if you wish to have flight paths on multiple stories of your home, suggesting that it cannot go upstairs. The page also hints that the device might be quite loud. While Ring is quick to note that the drone is not intended to be operated while you're at home, it does state that the volume matches a vacuum or blender, which we'd say is pretty loud. These are all features that will likely be ironed out in future generations, though. 

Ring Always Home Cam, Amazon (opens in new tab)

Ring Always Home Cam, Amazon (opens in new tab)

So far, the ring Always Home is only available by invitation, so while you can't buy it quite yet, you can keep an eye on it on Amazon here. 

When will the Ring Always Home Cam be released, and how much will it cost?

If you're itching to get your hands on this clever piece of kit, you'll need to practice patience. Despite originally being announced in late 2020, the Always Home Cam is still yet to go on sale to the general public and has been open for invitation orders only since 2022, which could suggest a couple of issues with the design or manufacture. That said, it was spotted at tech event CES 2023 a few days ago, so progress looks promising. 

So what about cost? For a new piece of tech, it's quite reasonably priced at $249, but that could be subject to change. It's currently only on offer on an invitation-only basis, but watch this space - we're sure we can all expect some exciting things from Ring in 2023. 

Lilith Hudson
Junior writer

Lilith Hudson is the Junior Writer on Livingetc, and an expert at decoding trends and reporting on them as they happen. Writing news articles for our digital platform, she's the go-to person for all the latest micro-trends, interior hacks, and color inspiration that you need in your home. She discovered a love for lifestyle journalism during her BA in English and Philosophy at the University of Nottingham where she spent more time writing for her student magazine than she did studying. Lilith now holds an MA in Magazine Journalism from City, University of London (a degree where she could combine both) and has previously worked at the Saturday Times Magazine, ES Magazine, DJ Mag and The Simple Things Magazine.