This IKEA hack creates a super-chic wireless mushroom lamp for less than $20

Mushroom lamps have been one of the biggest lighting trends of 2022. With this simple IKEA hack you make one yourself

A mushroom lamp lit up on a dark table
(Image credit: Madycke Elisabeth (@madison.mea))

When it comes to lighting, the mushroom lamp reigned supreme in 2022. The quirky retro design pairs iconic 70s style with the curved furniture trend that we've all been loving, making it one of the most on-trend lighting ideas of the past year - so much so, it's increasingly hard to find one. Thankfully, with the help of this clever IKEA hack, you can put your DIY skills to the test and make your own for less than $20. 

This ingenious IKEA hack is the handy work of Madycke Elisabeth (@madison.mea (opens in new tab)) who shares her artwork and DIY creations over on her Instagram and TikTok accounts. With just three simple IKEA items and a few basic materials she makes this wireless mushroom lamp from scratch, and we're itching to try it for ourselves. Here, she shares how it's done. 

Lilith headshot for bio
Lilith Hudson

Lilith is an expert at following news and trends across the world of interior design. A personal fan of the Scandi-inspired interior, her job entails keeping up with everything there is to know about the Swedish powerhouse IKEA. Paired with her insight into the latest home renovation projects, she regularly shares IKEA hacks with readers to inspire their own DIY projects in home design.

A white mushroom lamp

(Image credit: Madycke Elisabeth (@madison.mea))

Rather than make this IKEA hack to fill a lamp-filled hole in her life, it was social media that inspired Madycke to give this lighting trend a go. 'A time ago I was scrolling through TikTok and saw the original IKEA mushroom lamp "TOKABO",' she explains. 'It was cute but I didn’t really like the shape. A lot of people agreed and decided to make one themselves, which inspired me to do it my way.' 

Having seen the success of other people's DIY mushroom lamps, Madycke leapt to the challenge, rummaging in her craft corner to see which materials she already had. 'I always check first if I have something on hand and I had pretty much everything I needed, except for the things from IKEA,' she explains. 'Shoutout to my mom for getting me the "KARAFF (opens in new tab)" vase, "BLANDA (opens in new tab)" bowl and the "KORNSNÖ (opens in new tab)" lamp.'

In terms of materials, those are the only three IKEA items you'll need. What's even better is that they'll only cost you $15 to buy. Besides those, you'll need some spray paint, a screwdriver, painter's tape, and two batteries to power the KORNSNÖ lamp. 

A lit up mushroom lamp

(Image credit: Madycke Elisabeth (@madison.mea))

Once you've gathered all the materials, it's time to put them together. If you usually shy away from larger IKEA furniture hacks that involve power tools and flat-pack furniture, you'll be pleased to hear this one is far more simple. 'I live by the motto "never not creating", and this was such an easy DIY to do,' Madycke notes. 

'To protect the outside of the vase and bowl I first taped it off. Then I covered the inside completely using the spray paint,' she continues. 'When doing this, make sure your paint is not too opaque or your light won't shine through properly.' For a mushroom beige color like Madycke's lamp, we suggest using Rust Oleum's paint in Satin Shell white, available from Amazon (opens in new tab)

A mushroom lamp on a decorated table

(Image credit: Madycke Elisabeth (@madison.mea))

Once you've let your paint dry (we recommend waiting a least a day), it's simply a case of putting the three different components together. All you need to do is stand the vase on a table and place the KORNSNÖ light face down into the vase. Remember to add the batteries to the light first (you'll need a screwdriver to remove the plastic cover). You should find that the light is a perfect fit inside the vase. 

Next, simply place the BLENDA bowl upside down so that it rests on top of the light. When you push it down, you'll activate the push button on the light, turning on your lamp.

Madycke doesn't fix her bowl onto the lamp, but you might want to use white tack or a large adhesive double-sided sticker pad, like these ones from Amazon (opens in new tab). Bear in mind that you'll need access to the KORNSNÖ light when the batteries run out, so make sure you don't secure the bowl and vase permanently together.

A mushroom lamp lit up on a table

(Image credit: Madycke Elisabeth (@madison.mea))

Whether used as a bedroom, kitchen or living room lighting idea this lamp offers a cozy, ambient glow as the light shines through the painted glass. I love the whimsical look it creates, transporting you to a magical fairy forest.

'The lamp is super easy to make for your interior, which is what makes this DIY so much fun,' says Madycke. 'You can make it completely to your own taste, too!' If you want to have a go at customizing your own mushroom lamp, you could mix up the paint colors to suit your decor, or try using IKEA's stainless steel BLANDA bowl (opens in new tab) for a more subtle downcast lighting effect in the stem of your lamp. The possibilities are endless and we can't wait to give this weekend project a try for ourselves.

@madison.mea (opens in new tab)

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Lilith Hudson
Junior writer

Lilith Hudson is the Junior Writer on Livingetc, and an expert at decoding trends and reporting on them as they happen. Writing news articles for our digital platform, she's the go-to person for all the latest micro-trends, interior hacks, and color inspiration that you need in your home. She discovered a love for lifestyle journalism during her BA in English and Philosophy at the University of Nottingham where she spent more time writing for her student magazine than she did studying. Lilith now holds an MA in Magazine Journalism from City, University of London (a degree where she could combine both) and has previously worked at the Saturday Times Magazine, ES Magazine, DJ Mag and The Simple Things Magazine.