See how a tiny city apartment in Rome packs in statement interiors

This tiny city apartment disrupts tradition with a bold colour palette, graphic lines and a pinch of minimalism.

A compact 1950s apartment in Rome's Appio Latino district, just a few steps from the Caffarella Park, has received a strikingly bold transformation.

The owners, a young couple, asked Rome-based duo La Macchina Studio to preserve the original Venetian terrazzo flooring, while also disrupting tradition with a wholly new look.

The architects gave the 75 sqm, one bedroom apartment a surreal and theatrical edge, while keeping furnishings relatively minimal. The end look is a celebration graphic lines, bold colours and minimalism.

minimalist apartment

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

As the apartment is long and narrow, it's divided into three sections. At the far left end is a small living room area, in the middle is a kitchen and dining area, while the bedroom and bathroom is at the other end to the right.

The living room is zoned by a yellow curtain which replaced a former partition wall. The curtain acts as a softer border, separating the kitchen and living area while giving a bigger sense of space.

minimalist apartment

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

minimalist apartment

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

The apartment is punctuated by an arched, lacquered wood blue door which leads to the bedroom.

minimalist home

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

painted doorway

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

The door, with its wooden profile that juts out 70cm towards the dining room, is the centrepiece of the open-plan living space and hides the kitchen furniture from view of the bedroom.

painted doorway

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

minimalist apartment italy

View from the bedroom into the apartment

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

Meanwhile the bedroom features a softer colour palette of pinks and dusty reds, with velvety curtains and a microcement floor.

pink bedroom

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

The white mosaic tiled bathroom features a striking grey-blue, flush-to-the-wall arch that seems drawn on, framing a view to the freestanding washbasin and blue enamel wall.

This blending of shapes, designs and colours creates a “collage” effect when placed next to and in front of each other like this.

cloakroom design

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

bathroom tiles

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

cloakroom design

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

The narrow corridor hides built-in storage. The white lacquered bridge wardrobe also hides a small study, creating an isolated area tucked away from the rest of the apartment, making it easier to work from home.

hallway

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

built in storage

(Image credit: ©Paolo Fusco)

Materials

Venetian terrazzo floors

Microcement floors

Furniture and craftsmanship in lacquered wood

Ceramic mosaic and wall enamel coverings

Architecture: La Macchina Studio (Gianni Puri, Enrica Siracusa)

Photography: Paolo Fusco

Lotte Brouwer
Lotte Brouwer

Lotte is the Digital Editor for Livingetc, and has been with the website since its launch. She has a background in online journalism and writing for SEO, with previous editor roles at Good Living, Good Housekeeping, Country & Townhouse, and BBC Good Food among others, as well as her own successful interiors blog. When she's not busy writing or tracking analytics, she's doing up houses, two of which have features in interior design magazines. She's just finished doing up her house in Wimbledon, and is eyeing up Bath for her next project.